Sisters, Stay Alive & Informed!

Officially join my family and receive information, insight and inspiration on living a healthy, happy and prosperous life.

I am not a robot

Our Privacy Policy
mail
arrow

WE CAN NO LONGER BE SILENT

by Ngozi Osuagwu, MD | June 1st, 2020

WE CAN NO LONGER BE SILENT

“In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends.”

                                                                                                 Martin Luther King, Jr.

This past week has been emotionally difficult for me as I am sure it has been for most people. I watched videos from different angles of a man being murdered by police officers even as he and others pleaded for his life. If there is a silver lining to this senseless execution of a black man, most people regardless of race or gender agree it was blatant murder.  The thought that have kept crossing my mind is that the man George Floyd could have been  my son, my husband, my brothers, my nephews, my uncles, my cousins and my male friends.  And their lives are important not only because they are human beings but for what they mean to me.

We can no longer sweep this issue of police brutality under the rug and pretend it does not happen. We need to call it for what it is. George Floyd’s death was the killing of an African-American man by a white police officer. Again, Mr. George Floyd was murdered because of the color of his skin. Regardless of your race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, and sexuality –whatever makes us different – We all have a responsibility to speak up. IT WAS WRONG. IT WAS INHUMANE. THERE’S NO PLACE FOR IT IN PRESENT DAY AMERICA. Unfortunately, this is the reality for African-Americans and EVERYONE needs to be part of the solution to end this. We all need to talk about the role RACISM plays in causing the premature death of African-Americans. And then act in a united manner to implement all kinds of policies to eliminate this scourge that if left unchecked will be the end of our country. Thank God for Chris Cooper. Who knows what would have happened to him in Central Park if the New York City Police Department officers responded quickly to Amy Cooper’s (no relation of Chris Cooper) staged frantic call just because she was asked to put a leash on her dog where clearly visible signs required that.

Franklin County has joined a few counties in the United States to declare that racism is a public health crisis. This should not be limited to a few counties. All counties in the United States must declare racism as a PUBLIC HEALTH CRISIS.  To be defined as a public health crisis, Dr. Sandro Galea, Dean of Boston University School of Public Health, notes that the problem must affect large numbers of people, it must threaten the health over the long-term and it must require the adoption of large scale solutions. By declaring racism as a public health crisis, we educate the public and address legacy policies that have created and continue to perpetuate inequities in the health system. WE MUST NO LONGER BE SILENT. WE MUST ACT. I SHOULD ACT. YOU SHOULD ACT.

What’s one to do to bring about these changes that we all desire. Melody Cooper, Chris Cooper’s sister captured it succinctly in her opinion piece in the May 31, 2020 issue of The New York Times … If you’re an ally, what can you do? Stand with us. Bear witness. Continue the discussion and support legal action. Refuse to accept racism in your midst, even in small ways — call out a cruel joke or rude behavior. Be brave and challenge it all. You can transform your own world through how you teach your children, and how you speak to your neighbors and co-workers. It is up to you, not to a leader nor any single protest or petition. Your everyday commitment is what will start to bring the change you want to see. Start small, step forward and let your action join with others’ to become a rising tide that cannot be stopped….

Graphic by Gbenga Olawuyi

4 Responses to “WE CAN NO LONGER BE SILENT”

  1. Tracy Davis says:

    Amen!! Thank you for using your platform to share your opinion on this matter!

  2. It will have to start in our small circles where we are with people who look like us and be able to say, “That’s not right” even if that will alienate us.

Leave a Reply

*

code

Secure Your Copy of Letters to My Sisters by Dr. Ngozi Osuagwu.
secimg

The book discusses common gynecological and women’s health issues in a series of witty and entertaining letters. These letters, all educational, offer suggestions on what approaches to take in tackling the medical problems that typically bring women to an ob/gynecologist. The letters are spiced with art, a poem and quotes. Although its emphasis is on gynecology and women’s health, it touches on some other medical issues that make women visit their doctors.

The second half of the book briefly discusses the most common gynecological conditions and also provides an overview of sexually transmitted infections. A list of annotated websites dealing with the different topics in the book is provided for the reader who wants to pursue each subject in depth.




Ready to Commit to Living a Healthier Life, Start Here with…

Dr Ngozi’s 30 Day Alive & Healthy Challenge
alive

Get 30 days of insight and inspiration on creating and sustaining a healthy lifestyle straight from the
doctor. Share this valuable resource with your mother, sisters, daughters, grandmothers, aunts, cousins
and girlfriends. Do it solo, or in a group. Simply do it! Join our mailing list and get instant access to this life-saving resource now!