Sisters, Stay Alive & Informed!

Officially join my family and receive information, insight and inspiration on living a healthy, happy and prosperous life.

    I am not a robot

    Our Privacy Policy
    mail
    arrow

    The Men In Our Lives

    by Ngozi Osuagwu, MD | June 20th, 2016

    The Men In Our Lives

    They are our husbands, boyfriends,  grandfathers, fathers, adopted fathers, step-fathers,  uncles, brothers, sons and friends – On January 19, 2016 we celebrated them.  Unlike women, most men do not see a physician unless it is required by their job, they are sick or a certain part of their body is not functioning as it should.  I know my focus has been on ‘keeping my sisters alive and healthy’ but I also want my sisters to be happy and that means keeping our brothers alive and healthy as well.

    In celebration of Father’s Day, I would like to remind each of us to encourage the men that are dear to us to get their general check-up and preventative screening tests. It might require us making the extra effort to schedule the appointment for them and escort them to the appointment.  I believe it will be worth it at the end.

    Like us, they should know their numbers which include their weight, height, blood pressure, total cholesterol, LDL and hemoglobin A1C. This will allow the physician to check their body mass index and screen for cholesterol problems and diabetes. For more details about the numbers, please visit the previous blog, What’s Your Number?

    Cancer screening is very important and based on their age, their physician will recommend screening for testicular, prostate and colon cancer. They will also need to make sure that they are up to date with their vaccines. Let me remind everyone that the HPV vaccine that was discussed earlier this year is also available to boys and young men.

    And yes, when I referred to that certain part of the body, I was alluding to erectile dysfunction or ED. Sometimes ED can be a sign of medical problems that have not yet been diagnosed like high blood pressure, diabetes or chronic kidney disease to name a few. We should not be silent about this disease. It affects both people in a relationship. Talking about it and seeing a physician will be helpful.

    Exercise with them. Encourage them to adopt good eating habits (mostly vegetables and fruits). Limit the alcohol consumption. Quit smoking if that is an issue. Help them relieve stress with meditation.

    As women, we are known to make the health care decisions for our family. Let us make sure that the men that we love are doing what they need to do to be alive and healthy.

     

     

     

     

     

    One Response to “The Men In Our Lives”

    Leave a Reply

    *

    code

    Secure Your Copy of Letters to My Sisters by Dr. Ngozi Osuagwu.
    secimg

    The book discusses common gynecological and women’s health issues in a series of witty and entertaining letters. These letters, all educational, offer suggestions on what approaches to take in tackling the medical problems that typically bring women to an ob/gynecologist. The letters are spiced with art, a poem and quotes. Although its emphasis is on gynecology and women’s health, it touches on some other medical issues that make women visit their doctors.

    The second half of the book briefly discusses the most common gynecological conditions and also provides an overview of sexually transmitted infections. A list of annotated websites dealing with the different topics in the book is provided for the reader who wants to pursue each subject in depth.




    Ready to Commit to Living a Healthier Life, Start Here with…

    Dr Ngozi’s 30 Day Alive & Healthy Challenge
    alive

    Get 30 days of insight and inspiration on creating and sustaining a healthy lifestyle straight from the
    doctor. Share this valuable resource with your mother, sisters, daughters, grandmothers, aunts, cousins
    and girlfriends. Do it solo, or in a group. Simply do it! Join our mailing list and get instant access to this life-saving resource now!